Incidents

Rogue anti-spyware on Twitter

In addition to Trojans and Worms, Twitter seems to also be a good platform for distributing rogue security solutions. The latest example of this is a program called “MalwareRemovalBot” which we detect as “not-a-virus:FraudTool.Win32.MalwareRomovalBot.e”.

The link in the tweets leads to the ‘vendor’ site – and nearly every link here leads to the download.

The downloaded filename varies – “setup.exe”, “setupxv.exe” or “setup-trial.exe”. It’s a UPX-compressed Windows PE-executable.Once the program’s installed

and a scan’s been run, the program may report fake spyware infections to scare the user and get him to “register”.

The registration website leads to the shop where a “special offer” is waiting for the potential customer.

A license for a single PC costs as much as the 3 PC license – $39.95 plus two ‘extra’ technologies for $9.95. The total payment of $59.85 can be made by PayPal or credit-card. Pretty expensive for fake protection.

Conclusion: You can’t expect every tweet to lead to an interesting website, but you can expect that some of them will lead to malicious sites. Use your common sense, and don’t be a twit when you tweet.

Rogue anti-spyware on Twitter

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Reports

The leap of a Cycldek-related threat actor

The investigation described in this article started with one such file which caught our attention due to the various improvements it brought to this well-known infection vector.

Lazarus targets defense industry with ThreatNeedle

In mid-2020, we realized that Lazarus was launching attacks on the defense industry using the ThreatNeedle cluster, an advanced malware cluster of Manuscrypt (a.k.a. NukeSped). While investigating this activity, we were able to observe the complete life cycle of an attack, uncovering more technical details and links to the group’s other campaigns.

Sunburst backdoor – code overlaps with Kazuar

While looking at the Sunburst backdoor, we discovered several features that overlap with a previously identified backdoor known as Kazuar. Our observations shows that Kazuar was used together with Turla tools during multiple breaches in past years.

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