Incidents

Rogue anti-spyware on Twitter

In addition to Trojans and Worms, Twitter seems to also be a good platform for distributing rogue security solutions. The latest example of this is a program called “MalwareRemovalBot” which we detect as “not-a-virus:FraudTool.Win32.MalwareRomovalBot.e”.

The link in the tweets leads to the ‘vendor’ site – and nearly every link here leads to the download.

The downloaded filename varies – “setup.exe”, “setupxv.exe” or “setup-trial.exe”. It’s a UPX-compressed Windows PE-executable.Once the program’s installed

and a scan’s been run, the program may report fake spyware infections to scare the user and get him to “register”.

The registration website leads to the shop where a “special offer” is waiting for the potential customer.

A license for a single PC costs as much as the 3 PC license – $39.95 plus two ‘extra’ technologies for $9.95. The total payment of $59.85 can be made by PayPal or credit-card. Pretty expensive for fake protection.

Conclusion: You can’t expect every tweet to lead to an interesting website, but you can expect that some of them will lead to malicious sites. Use your common sense, and don’t be a twit when you tweet.

Rogue anti-spyware on Twitter

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Reports

GhostEmperor: From ProxyLogon to kernel mode

While investigating a recent rise of attacks against Exchange servers, we noticed a recurring cluster of activity that appeared in several distinct compromised networks. With a long-standing operation, high profile victims, advanced toolset and no affinity to a known threat actor, we decided to dub the cluster GhostEmperor.

APT trends report Q2 2021

This is our latest summary of advanced persistent threat (APT) activity, focusing on significant events that we observed during Q2 2021: attacks against Microsoft Exchange servers, APT29 and APT31 activities, targeting campaigns, etc.

LuminousMoth APT: Sweeping attacks for the chosen few

We recently came across unusual APT activity that was detected in high volumes, albeit most likely aimed at a few targets of interest. Further analysis revealed that the actor, which we dubbed LuminousMoth, shows an affinity to the HoneyMyte group, otherwise known as Mustang Panda.

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