Honeypots and the Internet of Things

According to Gartner, there are currently over 6 billion IoT devices on the planet. Such a huge number of potentially vulnerable gadgets could not possibly go unnoticed by cybercriminals. As of May 2017, Kaspersky Lab’s collections included several thousand different malware samples for IoT devices, about half of which were detected in 2017.

no-image

Ztorg: from rooting to SMS

I’ve been monitoring Google Play Store for new Ztorg Trojans since September 2016, and have so far found several dozen new malicious apps. All of them were rooting malware that used exploits to gain root rights on the infected device. In May 2017, a new Ztorg variant appeared on the Google Play Store – only this this time it wasn’t a rooting malware but a Trojan-SMS. Read Full Article

no-image

Two Tickets as Bait

Over the previous weekend, social networks were hit with a wave of posts that falsely claimed that major airlines were giving away tickets for free. Users from all over the world became involved in this: they published posts that mentioned Emirates, Air France, Aeroflot, S7 Airline, Eva Air, Turkish Airlines, Air Asia, Air India, and other companies. Read Full Article

no-image

50 hashes per hour

In this research we’ll be revisiting the USB port – this time in attempts to intercept user authentication data on the system that a microcomputer is connected to. As we discovered, this type of attack successfully allows an intruder to retrieve user authentication data – even when the targeted system is locked. Read Full Article

no-image

Dridex: A History of Evolution

In the several years that the Dridex family has existed, there have been numerous unsuccessful attempts to block the botnet’s activity. The ongoing evolution of the malware demonstrates that the cybercriminals are not about to bid farewell to their brainchild, which is providing them with a steady revenue stream. Read Full Article

no-image

WannaCry and Lazarus Group – the missing link?

Moments ago, Neel Mehta, a researcher at Google posted a mysterious message on Twitter. The cryptic message in fact refers to similarity between samples that have shared code between themselves. The two samples Neel refers to post are a Wannacry cryptor sample and a Lazarus APT group sample. Read Full Article

no-image

WannaCry FAQ: What you need to know today

Friday May 12th marked the start of the dizzying madness that has been ‘WannaCry’, the largest ransomware infection in history. Defenders have been running around trying to understand the malware’s capabilities. In the process, a lot of wires have gotten crossed and we figured it’s time to sit down and set the record straight on what we know, what we wish we knew, and what the near future might hold for us going forward. Read Full Article