Publications

Verdict in Sasser trial

Sven Jaschan, the teenager who became notorious for writing the Sasser and Netsky worms was sentenced today by the court in Verden, Germany. The decision of the court, softened by the fact that Jaschan was a minor at the time he authored the viruses, is 18 months suspended sentence and 30 hours of community service. Initially, the prosecutors asked for a two year suspended sentence and three years of probation. However, even though the criminal trial is over, Jaschan still faces civil cases against him – four plaintiffs have already asked for compensation for damage caused by the teenager’s creation.

The decision – a fair one in my opinion – will no doubt play an important role in Sven Jaschan’s life. With all the “celebrity” gained from the process and given the fact that he already has a job in the security field, Jaschan could have a very bright future ahead – Mitnick’s roadshows bear witness to that. On the other hand, I’m sure the judges would not be so tolerant if Jaschan wrote another piece of malware and unleashed it on the Internet.

Verdict in Sasser trial

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

Reports

Operation TunnelSnake

A newly discovered rootkit that we dub ‘Moriya’ is used by an unknown actor to deploy passive backdoors on public facing servers, facilitating the creation of a covert C&C communication channel through which they can be silently controlled. The victims are located in Africa, South and South-East Asia.

APT trends report Q1 2021

This report highlights significant events related to advanced persistent threat (APT) activity observed in Q1 2021. The summaries are based on our threat intelligence research and provide a representative snapshot of what we have published and discussed in greater detail in our private APT reports.

The leap of a Cycldek-related threat actor

The investigation described in this article started with one such file which caught our attention due to the various improvements it brought to this well-known infection vector.

Subscribe to our weekly e-mails

The hottest research right in your inbox