Malware descriptions

The IM worms armada

We’ve noticed an increase in the prevalence of Y!/MSN-aware worms. These rely on various social engineering tricks to lure the user into a malicious website. For instance, IM-Worm.Win32.Qucan.c sends messages like this:

The link shows a URL nicely disguised as a JPEG file. The actual page, which contains an encrypted javascript to avoid direct inspection, uses a combination of Exploit.JS.ADODB.Stream.e and a more recent MDAC (MS06-014) exploit to install the worm in the system. Unfortunately, even though a patch for the MDAC exploit had been released in May 2006, we have quite a few Qucan.c/Sohanad.e cases reported.

Of course, if you have Firefox or Opera set as the default browser, the exploit doesn’t work.

BTW, if you’re still – for some obscure reason – using IE, it may be worth checking v7, which was just released. It works only on XP+SP2, though.

The IM worms armada

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Reports

The leap of a Cycldek-related threat actor

The investigation described in this article started with one such file which caught our attention due to the various improvements it brought to this well-known infection vector.

Lazarus targets defense industry with ThreatNeedle

In mid-2020, we realized that Lazarus was launching attacks on the defense industry using the ThreatNeedle cluster, an advanced malware cluster of Manuscrypt (a.k.a. NukeSped). While investigating this activity, we were able to observe the complete life cycle of an attack, uncovering more technical details and links to the group’s other campaigns.

Sunburst backdoor – code overlaps with Kazuar

While looking at the Sunburst backdoor, we discovered several features that overlap with a previously identified backdoor known as Kazuar. Our observations shows that Kazuar was used together with Turla tools during multiple breaches in past years.

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