Malware descriptions

The IM worms armada

We’ve noticed an increase in the prevalence of Y!/MSN-aware worms. These rely on various social engineering tricks to lure the user into a malicious website. For instance, IM-Worm.Win32.Qucan.c sends messages like this:

The link shows a URL nicely disguised as a JPEG file. The actual page, which contains an encrypted javascript to avoid direct inspection, uses a combination of Exploit.JS.ADODB.Stream.e and a more recent MDAC (MS06-014) exploit to install the worm in the system. Unfortunately, even though a patch for the MDAC exploit had been released in May 2006, we have quite a few Qucan.c/Sohanad.e cases reported.

Of course, if you have Firefox or Opera set as the default browser, the exploit doesn’t work.

BTW, if you’re still – for some obscure reason – using IE, it may be worth checking v7, which was just released. It works only on XP+SP2, though.

The IM worms armada

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Reports

Andariel deploys DTrack and Maui ransomware

Earlier, the CISA published an alert related to a Stairwell report, “Maui Ransomware.” Our data should openly help solidify the attribution of the Maui ransomware incident to the Korean-speaking APT Andariel, also known as Silent Chollima and Stonefly.

APT trends report Q2 2022

This is our latest summary of advanced persistent threat (APT) activity, focusing on events that we observed during Q2 2022.

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