Incidents

Disliking Facebook LikeJacking

Another Facebook likejacking attempt is being spammed out to fool Facebook users with “5 things girls do before she meets her boyfriend”. Instead of presenting a video, the page redirects browsers to a “Like” button hosted on Facebook.

As illustrated above, tens of thousands of people have clicked on the link while they are logged into Facebook already. If you are one of the people who have already attempted to watch the video, please remove the “like” entry from your wall or newsfeed. Also, delete the liked page from your “Likes and Interests” section.

If you are using Facebook, be wary of what you click on. While this one may not be as serious an issue as some of the other Facebook scams we have seen, you probably don’t want to provide this plugin developer with more demographic statistics of who falls for phony videos.

Even more interesting information falls out when you investigate a bit deeper. Attempting to access the “HTML source” results in an offer suggesting that you sell your fan pages to a suspicious email address, which is not recommended.

Disliking Facebook LikeJacking

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Reports

APT trends report Q3 2021

The APT trends reports are based on our threat intelligence research and provide a representative snapshot of what we have discussed in greater detail in our private APT reports. This is our latest installment, focusing on activities that we observed during Q3 2021.

Lyceum group reborn

According to older public researches, Lyceum conducted operations against organizations in the energy and telecommunications sectors across the Middle East. In 2021, we have been able to identify a new cluster of the group’s activity, focused on two entities in Tunisia.

GhostEmperor: From ProxyLogon to kernel mode

While investigating a recent rise of attacks against Exchange servers, we noticed a recurring cluster of activity that appeared in several distinct compromised networks. With a long-standing operation, high profile victims, advanced toolset and no affinity to a known threat actor, we decided to dub the cluster GhostEmperor.

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