Publications

Verizon’s 2020 DBIR

Verizon’s 2020 DBIR is out, you can download a copy or peruse their publication online. Kaspersky was a contributor once again, and we are happy to provide generalized incident data from our unique and objective research.

We have contributed to this project and others like it for years now. This year’s ~120 page report analyses data from us and 80 other contributors from all over the world. The team provides thoughts on a mountain of breach data – “This year, we analyzed a record total of 157,525 incidents. Of those, 32,002 met our quality standards and 3,950 were confirmed data breaches”. And this year, Verizon pulled in far more data on cybercrime breaches. We include a few interesting notes here:

  • 70% of reported breaches were perpetrated by external actors
  • a majority of breaches do not just involve a dropped trojan
  • 86% of breaches were financially motivated
  • 81% of breaches were contained in days or less
  • defenders are up against organized crime
  • almost a third of reported breaches involved ransomware

Verizon’s 2020 DBIR

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Reports

GhostEmperor: From ProxyLogon to kernel mode

While investigating a recent rise of attacks against Exchange servers, we noticed a recurring cluster of activity that appeared in several distinct compromised networks. With a long-standing operation, high profile victims, advanced toolset and no affinity to a known threat actor, we decided to dub the cluster GhostEmperor.

APT trends report Q2 2021

This is our latest summary of advanced persistent threat (APT) activity, focusing on significant events that we observed during Q2 2021: attacks against Microsoft Exchange servers, APT29 and APT31 activities, targeting campaigns, etc.

LuminousMoth APT: Sweeping attacks for the chosen few

We recently came across unusual APT activity that was detected in high volumes, albeit most likely aimed at a few targets of interest. Further analysis revealed that the actor, which we dubbed LuminousMoth, shows an affinity to the HoneyMyte group, otherwise known as Mustang Panda.

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