Spam and phishing mail

Stealing User’s Password with Free Online Forms

I just received a spam e-mail in Portuguese stating that my mailbox had exceeded its maximum storage.

TranslationAttention! Your email box has exceeded the 20Gb storage limit set by the Administrator. At this moment you are using 20,9Gb and can’t send or receive new messages unless you revalidate your email inbox. 
Please click on or copy the link below to revalidate and to update it. 
You have to access your email box via the link below to update and revalidate your email inbox. 
Thank you,
Email Administrator. 

It’s classic phishing, abusing Free online forms. If you click, you will see the next set of messages:

(This Captcha warning message is not in Portuguese anymore but in French)

Why do such simple attacks still work? Well, in Latin America, in the good sense of this word, people are very naïve. It’s clear that attacks do not need to be complex to be effective. Simple tricks used 10-15 years ago are still functioning for cybercriminals. And as you can see, there is no need to clone an original Web site, so any rookie cybercriminal is able to use such methods to steal users’ information.

I already reported the form as fraudulent and hope it will be taken down quickly.

Stealing User’s Password with Free Online Forms

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

Reports

APT trends report Q3 2021

The APT trends reports are based on our threat intelligence research and provide a representative snapshot of what we have discussed in greater detail in our private APT reports. This is our latest installment, focusing on activities that we observed during Q3 2021.

Lyceum group reborn

According to older public researches, Lyceum conducted operations against organizations in the energy and telecommunications sectors across the Middle East. In 2021, we have been able to identify a new cluster of the group’s activity, focused on two entities in Tunisia.

GhostEmperor: From ProxyLogon to kernel mode

While investigating a recent rise of attacks against Exchange servers, we noticed a recurring cluster of activity that appeared in several distinct compromised networks. With a long-standing operation, high profile victims, advanced toolset and no affinity to a known threat actor, we decided to dub the cluster GhostEmperor.

Subscribe to our weekly e-mails

The hottest research right in your inbox