Archive

Malware Calendar Wallpaper for December 2011

Here’s the latest of our malware calendar wallpapers.

 


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Christmas brings many more people online since the Internet provides a quick and convenient way to buy Christmas gifts. This makes it the perfect time for cybercriminals to cash-in on online activity. So it’s also a good time for a reminder about the basic things you can do to reduce the risk of cybercriminals spoiling your Christmas.

 

  1. Install Internet security software and keep it updated.
  2. Keep Windows and other applications up-to-date.
  3. Backup your data regularly to a CD, DVD, or external USB drive.
  4. Don’t respond to email messages if you don’t know the sender.
  5. Don’t click on email attachments if you don’t know the sender.
  6. Don’t click on links in email or IM (instant messaging) messages. Type the address directly into your web browser.
  7. Don’t give out personal information in response to an email or other message, even if it looks official.
  8. Only shop, bank or socialise on secure sites. Make sure the URL starts with ‘https://’.
  9. Use a different password for each web site or service you use. Don’t recycle them (e.g. ‘jackie1’, ‘jackie2’). Don’t make them easy to guess (e.g. mum’s name, pet’s name). Don’t tell anyone your passwords.

 

Malware Calendar Wallpaper for December 2011

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Reports

Operation TunnelSnake

A newly discovered rootkit that we dub ‘Moriya’ is used by an unknown actor to deploy passive backdoors on public facing servers, facilitating the creation of a covert C&C communication channel through which they can be silently controlled. The victims are located in Africa, South and South-East Asia.

APT trends report Q1 2021

This report highlights significant events related to advanced persistent threat (APT) activity observed in Q1 2021. The summaries are based on our threat intelligence research and provide a representative snapshot of what we have published and discussed in greater detail in our private APT reports.

The leap of a Cycldek-related threat actor

The investigation described in this article started with one such file which caught our attention due to the various improvements it brought to this well-known infection vector.

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