Malware reports

Malware Miscellany, December 2008

  • Greediest Trojan targeting banks
    Trojan.Win32.Qhost.gn wins this category, by redirecting clients of 39 different banks to phishing sites.

  • Greediest Trojan targeting payment systems and payment cards
    Just like last month, a single piece of malware comes out top in these two categories. This time, it’s Trojan.Win32.Agent.eii, which targets users of three payment systems and 4 payment cards simultaneously.

  • Stealthiest malicious program
    Trojan-PSW.Win32.LdPinch.auv is packed with 10 different packers.

  • Smallest malicious program
    Trojan.BAT.Shutdown.g is a mere 20 bytes, but it’s still able to reboot the infected computer in spite of its minute size.

  • Largest malicious program
    Trojan-Banker.Win32.Banbra.bby is 27 MB in size.

  • Most common malicious code which exploits a vulnerability
    In December, exploits for an SWF vulnerability made up 12% of all malicious content.

  • Most common malicious code on the Internet
    Trojan-Downloader.HTML.IFrame.wf accounted for nearly 8% of all malicious traffic this month.

  • Most common Trojan family
    1499 previously unknown modifications make Backdoor.Win32.Hupigon the winner of this category in December.

  • Most common virus/ worm family
    Worm.Win32.AutoRun came up with 312 new modifications this month, putting it at the top of this class.

Malware Miscellany, December 2008

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Reports

APT trends report Q3 2021

The APT trends reports are based on our threat intelligence research and provide a representative snapshot of what we have discussed in greater detail in our private APT reports. This is our latest installment, focusing on activities that we observed during Q3 2021.

Lyceum group reborn

According to older public researches, Lyceum conducted operations against organizations in the energy and telecommunications sectors across the Middle East. In 2021, we have been able to identify a new cluster of the group’s activity, focused on two entities in Tunisia.

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