Events

What does it take to become a good reverse engineer?

How much money and effort does it take to become a good reverse engineer? Do you even need to be one?

There are no universally acceptable answers to these questions. Software reverse engineering (RE) is not a science but a skillset combined with specific knowledge and backed by a lot of experience.

For several years, we have been sharing the RE knowledge that we accumulated in the form of training sessions provided to paying customers. These sessions took from two days at the SAS conference to complete five workdays in the extended version, and covered many aspects of our own work, primarily in IDA Pro and the in-lab reverse-engineering framework.

A typical piece of code disassembled in IDA Pro

Due to the novel 2019 coronavirus disease, our schedule for the training sessions has changed completely. But not only this; the reversing landscape itself has changed since last year. Released in March 2019, the free and open-source reverse engineering tool called Ghidra lowered the barrier to entry into the field.

The same piece of code viewed in Ghidra

So, while we are all working from home and, hopefully, have time to learn something new, why not tear some binary code apart and pick up some reverse engineering skills? This may prove especially helpful if your work is related to malware, incident response or forensics.

It is certainly not feasible to learn RE in one webinar. Within one hour, we will outline the typical workflow that we follow when analyzing malware. We will dissect real-life malicious code using both IDA Pro and Ghidra, and use some of the most useful features of these disassemblers.

The rest, as in many other disciplines, comes with experience. And, we are still looking forward to seeing you in our reverse engineering training sessions at SAS Conference 2020 (two days) or elsewhere (a whole week!).

What does it take to become a good reverse engineer?

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  1. Dim

    hi guys, any plans for APAC timezones?

  2. Abdul Hameed Oluwashegu Tade

    Need a mentor in reverse engineering. Anyone willing to help ?

Reports

Operation TunnelSnake

A newly discovered rootkit that we dub ‘Moriya’ is used by an unknown actor to deploy passive backdoors on public facing servers, facilitating the creation of a covert C&C communication channel through which they can be silently controlled. The victims are located in Africa, South and South-East Asia.

APT trends report Q1 2021

This report highlights significant events related to advanced persistent threat (APT) activity observed in Q1 2021. The summaries are based on our threat intelligence research and provide a representative snapshot of what we have published and discussed in greater detail in our private APT reports.

The leap of a Cycldek-related threat actor

The investigation described in this article started with one such file which caught our attention due to the various improvements it brought to this well-known infection vector.

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