Incidents

South Korean ‘Whois Team’ attacks

Earlier today, reports of a number of cyberattacks against various South Korean targets hit the news.

The attackers, going by the handle ?Whois Team¦ left a number of messages during the defacements:

The code used for defacement, posted by an anonymous user to the ?pygments.org¦ forum (see http://pygments.org/demo/68313/) indicates several e-mails used by the attackers:

arrFadeTitles[0] = “APTM4st3r@whois.com”;
arrFadeTitles[1] = “dbM4st3r@whois.com”;
arrFadeTitles[2] = “d3sign3r@whois.com”;
arrFadeTitles[3] = “vacc1nm45t3r@whois.com”;
arrFadeTitles[4] = “r3cycl3r@whois.com”;
arrFadeTitles[5] = “s3ll3r@whois.com”;

The screenshots from victim-s computers indicate the at ?Wiper¦ type of malware was also used. We have previously written about two other ?Wiper¦-style malwares: Iranian Wiper and Shamoon.

So, is this an isolated incident or part of a bigger cyberwar campaign? Honestly speaking, we don-t know. If a nation state is NOT behind these attacks, then it’s just cyber-terrorism; cyberwar requires a nation state to be behind the attacks.
In general, if the attacks target critical infrastructure, they can be considered cyber-terrorism. According to the definition of critical infrastructure, banks can be considered as such, therefore, this counts as a cyberterrorism attack.

Previous incidents like Stuxnet and Wiper were part of an ongoing cyberwar campaign that went for years, although in a more stealthy fashion.

Obviously, the attacks were designed to be ‘loud’ – the victims are broadcasting companies and banks. This makes us think we are not dealing with a serious, determined adversary but script kiddies or hacktivists looking for quick fame.

South Korean ‘Whois Team’ attacks

Your email address will not be published.

 

Reports

Kimsuky’s GoldDragon cluster and its C2 operations

Kimsuky (also known as Thallium, Black Banshee and Velvet Chollima) is a prolific and active threat actor primarily targeting Korea-related entities. In early 2022, we observed this group was attacking the media and a think-tank in South Korea.

Andariel deploys DTrack and Maui ransomware

Earlier, the CISA published an alert related to a Stairwell report, “Maui Ransomware.” Our data should openly help solidify the attribution of the Maui ransomware incident to the Korean-speaking APT Andariel, also known as Silent Chollima and Stonefly.

Subscribe to our weekly e-mails

The hottest research right in your inbox