Incidents

Social engineering: the latest chapter

A user notified us about a suspicious link being spread via MSN. Normally we would assume that there’s a new IM-Worm out there, since we’ve had quite a few of them this year.

However, the link itself attracted our attention:

http://www.vbulettin.com/[removed]

Naturally, anyone who follows information security knows Virus Bulletin: one of the oldest and most respected publications in the AV industry. Getting a VB award is a must for any reputable antivirus.

No, their site has not been hacked. If you read the URL carefully, you’ll notice that the word bulletin is misspelled – bulettin. Moreover, Virus Bulletin can be found on-line at a slightly different URL: www.virusbtn.com.

Most of us only scan URLs at best, and the malicious version is certainly close enough to the real thing to fool people. Virus writers are at it again: masquerading as a respected AV publication is a good way to get people to trust you.

Oh, before I forget… a new version of Backdoor.Win32.Landis is lurking at this link. If you receive this link, don’t click on it. There’s no IM-Worm involved, by the way – Landis sends the link out on command from its owner.

We’ve added detection for this new Trojan to our databases, so update just in case.

Social engineering: the latest chapter

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Reports

The leap of a Cycldek-related threat actor

The investigation described in this article started with one such file which caught our attention due to the various improvements it brought to this well-known infection vector.

Lazarus targets defense industry with ThreatNeedle

In mid-2020, we realized that Lazarus was launching attacks on the defense industry using the ThreatNeedle cluster, an advanced malware cluster of Manuscrypt (a.k.a. NukeSped). While investigating this activity, we were able to observe the complete life cycle of an attack, uncovering more technical details and links to the group’s other campaigns.

Sunburst backdoor – code overlaps with Kazuar

While looking at the Sunburst backdoor, we discovered several features that overlap with a previously identified backdoor known as Kazuar. Our observations shows that Kazuar was used together with Turla tools during multiple breaches in past years.

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