Publications

Named & shamed!

StopBadware.org, launched in January by Harvard University’s Berkman Centre and the Oxford Internet Institute, is designed to put pressure on purveyors of ‘badware’ programs by ‘naming and shaming’ them. ‘Badware’, according to the organization’s site, is ‘malicious software that tracks your moves online and feeds that information back to shady marketing groups so that they can ambush you with targeted ads’. The project is supported by Google, Sun and Lenovo.

StopBadware.org positions itself as ‘a “Neighbourhood Watch” campaign aimed at fighting badware.’ The project will ‘seek to provide reliable, objective information about downloadable applications in order to help consumers make better choices about what they download onto their computers.’ It also ‘aim[s] to become a central clearinghouse for research on badware and…[those] who spread it, and become a focal point for developing collaborative, community-minded approaches to stopping badware.’

Yesterday StopBadware.org issued its first reports, naming and shaming Kazaa, MediaPipe, SpyAxe and Screensaver.com as applications that ‘contain annoying or objectionable behaviors’.

Named & shamed!

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

Reports

The leap of a Cycldek-related threat actor

The investigation described in this article started with one such file which caught our attention due to the various improvements it brought to this well-known infection vector.

Lazarus targets defense industry with ThreatNeedle

In mid-2020, we realized that Lazarus was launching attacks on the defense industry using the ThreatNeedle cluster, an advanced malware cluster of Manuscrypt (a.k.a. NukeSped). While investigating this activity, we were able to observe the complete life cycle of an attack, uncovering more technical details and links to the group’s other campaigns.

Sunburst backdoor – code overlaps with Kazuar

While looking at the Sunburst backdoor, we discovered several features that overlap with a previously identified backdoor known as Kazuar. Our observations shows that Kazuar was used together with Turla tools during multiple breaches in past years.

Subscribe to our weekly e-mails

The hottest research right in your inbox