Publications

Malware Calendar Wallpaper for November 2011

Here’s the latest of our malware calendar wallpapers.


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This month’s calendar includes a fairly typical mix of cybercrime references. However, I’d like to highlight one in particular – the arrest of a Dutch teenager for stealing furniture from the Habbo Hotel virtual world.

To some people, the idea of having a virtual life seems strange. It may seem even stranger for the police to take an interest in the theft of something that’s not real. There are, of course, reasons why they would. For one thing, the virtual theft was carried out by stealing the login credentials of members of Habbo Hotel – essentially a real-world phishing scam like any other. For another, the theft and sale of virtual property can be as lucrative as any other type of cybercrime: in this case, the stolen goods had a real-world price-tag of more than €4,000.

This case underlines the fact that *any* kind of online transaction, if it can be used to make money illegally, if of interest to cybercriminals. So we all need to remain vigilant and take care to safeguard all our online activities.

Malware Calendar Wallpaper for November 2011

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Reports

APT trends report Q3 2021

The APT trends reports are based on our threat intelligence research and provide a representative snapshot of what we have discussed in greater detail in our private APT reports. This is our latest installment, focusing on activities that we observed during Q3 2021.

Lyceum group reborn

According to older public researches, Lyceum conducted operations against organizations in the energy and telecommunications sectors across the Middle East. In 2021, we have been able to identify a new cluster of the group’s activity, focused on two entities in Tunisia.

GhostEmperor: From ProxyLogon to kernel mode

While investigating a recent rise of attacks against Exchange servers, we noticed a recurring cluster of activity that appeared in several distinct compromised networks. With a long-standing operation, high profile victims, advanced toolset and no affinity to a known threat actor, we decided to dub the cluster GhostEmperor.

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