Research

Just for fun

I decided to introduce a bit of variety into my daily commute today by scanning the Wifi networks on the way to the office.

I used my Sony pcg-fxa53 laptop with a senao NL-2311CD Plus Ext2 pcmcia wifi card, an external antenna, and a garmin legend gps navigator. As for software, I used Linux SuSE OSS 10, kismet, gpsd, gpsmap and google api.

Once I’d thrown all that together (and of course I could write an article on that) I set off for work.

I live pretty close to the office, and my commute only takes about ten minutes – even in that time I was able to collect a fair bit of data which is shown in the picture below.

Overall, I detected 40 Wifi networks: the totally unprotected networks are marked with a red dot, those with WEP enabled are marked with a yellow dot, and those with WPA are marked with a green dot.

Just another little bit of data to add to our continuing research on wifi networks and encryption around the world.

Just for fun

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Reports

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