Incidents

Good news?

Today the University of Groningen in The Netherlands announced that they had been compromised. About 150 workstations were found to have a backdoor with keylogging functionality installed.

The interesting part is how the university found out about this. Namely through an anonymous phone call, most likely from someone involved in the hack.
This move by the hackers has led the university to believe that the intrusion was just for fun and without malicious intent.

I, on the other hand, am not so optimistic. Lately we’ve been seeing a number of stories where the hackers of university networks get caught. Therefore I think it’s much more likely that the hackers got cold feet.

By reporting their crime they were probably hoping that the university would forgive them and not follow up on the incident. After all, if the university decides not to press charges, the hackers won’t be investigated.

A nice example of social engineering – hack a network and then report it so the victim doesn’t press charges. Although I somehow doubt that it will become very popular with hackers around the world. 🙂

It would be bad news if the university decides not to press charges. In any case, the good news is that hackers seem to be wary of the authorities and unwilling to end up facing criminal charges.

Good news?

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Reports

The SessionManager IIS backdoor

In early 2022, we investigated an IIS backdoor called SessionManager. It has been used against NGOs, government, military and industrial organizations in Africa, South America, Asia, Europe, Russia and the Middle East.

APT ToddyCat

ToddyCat is a relatively new APT actor responsible for multiple sets of attacks against high-profile entities in Europe and Asia. Its main distinctive signs are two formerly unknown tools that we call ‘Samurai backdoor’ and ‘Ninja Trojan’.

WinDealer dealing on the side

We have discovered that malware dubbed WinDealer, spread by Chinese-speaking APT actor LuoYu, has an ability to perform intrusions through a man-on-the-side attack.

APT trends report Q1 2022

This is our latest summary of advanced persistent threat (APT) activity, focusing on events that we observed during Q1 2022.

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