Incidents

29A member convicted in Russia

In Russia a virus writer known as Whale has been pronounced guilty. His real name is Evgenii Suchkov, and we know that he belonged to 29A, the notorious virus writing group. We think he may also be a member of HangUp Team, a similar Russian group.

Suchkov’s trial was on 22nd October this year in Izhevsk, Russia. He admitted that he was guilty of writing two complex viruses: Stepar and Gastropod. He created these viruses and put the source code and exe files on some virus writing sites, including 29A website.

He was only fined 3,000 roubles or $100 and now has a criminal record. This isn’t much – but the court didn’t have any evidence to prove that the viruses had caused any material loss. But now Russian virus writers know that they are not always going to be able to hide from the law. And the world knows that Russia is doing something about virus writing.

29A member convicted in Russia

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

Reports

Lazarus targets defense industry with ThreatNeedle

In mid-2020, we realized that Lazarus was launching attacks on the defense industry using the ThreatNeedle cluster, an advanced malware cluster of Manuscrypt (a.k.a. NukeSped). While investigating this activity, we were able to observe the complete life cycle of an attack, uncovering more technical details and links to the group’s other campaigns.

Sunburst backdoor – code overlaps with Kazuar

While looking at the Sunburst backdoor, we discovered several features that overlap with a previously identified backdoor known as Kazuar. Our observations shows that Kazuar was used together with Turla tools during multiple breaches in past years.

Lazarus covets COVID-19-related intelligence

As the COVID-19 crisis grinds on, some threat actors are trying to speed up vaccine development by any means available. We have found evidence that the Lazarus group is going after intelligence that could help these efforts by attacking entities related to COVID-19 research.

Sunburst: connecting the dots in the DNS requests

We matched private and public DNS data for the SUNBURST-malware root C2 domain with the CNAME records, to identify who was targeted for further exploitation. In total, we analyzed 1722 DNS records, leading to 1026 unique target name parts and 964 unique UIDs.

Subscribe to our weekly e-mails

The hottest research right in your inbox