Web threats

Research

Cyberthreats on lockdown

The pandemic has affected us all in some way, so it would be surprising if cybercriminals were an exception. Spammers and phishers were naturally the trailblazers in this but the entire cybercrime landscape has changed in the last few months.

Research

The cybercrime ecosystem: attacking blogs

It is very common to see cybercriminals exploit vulnerabilities in blogging software such as WordPress and Joomla! for injecting their malicious code. In my research, I decided to investigate this further and see what the current threat landscape looks like by researching the most visited blogs in Sweden.

Research

Steam-powered scammers

One of the most popular platforms among users (and hence cybercriminals) is Steam, and we’ve been observing money-making schemes to defraud its users for quite some time. Since June, however, such attacks have become more frequent and, compared to previous attempts, far more sophisticated.

Publications

Data collectors

As we saw from the statistics, tech giants that collect and analyze data to show us targeted advertising are present practically everywhere in the world. And it is these companies that store the most data about people from all over the planet.

Reports

Sunburst backdoor – code overlaps with Kazuar

While looking at the Sunburst backdoor, we discovered several features that overlap with a previously identified backdoor known as Kazuar. Our observations shows that Kazuar was used together with Turla tools during multiple breaches in past years.

Lazarus covets COVID-19-related intelligence

As the COVID-19 crisis grinds on, some threat actors are trying to speed up vaccine development by any means available. We have found evidence that the Lazarus group is going after intelligence that could help these efforts by attacking entities related to COVID-19 research.

Sunburst: connecting the dots in the DNS requests

We matched private and public DNS data for the SUNBURST-malware root C2 domain with the CNAME records, to identify who was targeted for further exploitation. In total, we analyzed 1722 DNS records, leading to 1026 unique target name parts and 964 unique UIDs.

What did DeathStalker hide between two ferns?

While tracking DeathStalker’s Powersing-based activities in May 2020, we detected a previously unknown implant that leveraged DNS over HTTPS as a C2 channel, as well as parts of its delivery chain. We named this new malware “PowerPepper”.

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