APT trends report Q2 2019

The quarterly summaries of APT activity are based on our threat intelligence research and provide a representative snapshot of what we have published and discussed in greater detail in our private reports. This is our latest installment, focusing on activities that we observed during Q2 2019. Read Full Article

APT review of the year

What were the most interesting developments in terms of APT activity throughout the year and what can we learn from them? Not an easy question to answer. Still, with the benefit of hindsight, let’s try to approach the problem from different angles to get a better understanding of what went on. Read Full Article

Shedding Skin – Turla’s Fresh Faces

Turla, also known as Venomous Bear, Waterbug, and Uroboros, may be best known for what was at the time an “ultra complex” snake rootkit focused on NATO-related targets, but their malware set and activity is much broader. Our current focus is on more recent and upcoming activity from this APT. Read Full Article

Introducing WhiteBear

As a part of our Kaspersky APT Intelligence Reporting subscription, customers received an update in mid-February 2017 on some interesting APT activity that we called WhiteBear. It is a parallel project or second stage of the Skipper Turla cluster of activity documented in another private report. Like previous Turla activity, WhiteBear leverages compromised websites and hijacked satellite connections for command and control (C2) infrastructure. Read Full Article

APT Trends report Q2 2017

Since 2014, Kaspersky Lab’s Global Research and Analysis Team (GReAT) has been providing threat intelligence reports to a wide-range of customers worldwide, leading to the delivery of a full and dedicated private reporting service. Prior to the new service offering, GReAT published research online for the general public in an effort to help combat the ever-increasing threat from nation-state and other advanced actors. Read Full Article

Penquin’s Moonlit Maze

Moonlight Maze is the stuff of cyberespionage legend. In 1996 someone was rummaging through military, research, and university networks primarily in the United States, stealing sensitive information on a massive scale. To say that this historic threat actor is directly related to the modern day Turla would elevate an already formidable modern day attacker to another league altogether. Read Full Article